Series: Wisconsin's Diverse Waves Of Immigration

Many distinct and ongoing waves of immigration have indelibly shaped communities across Wisconsin. The 19th-century influxes of immigrants from Germany, Scandinavia and elsewhere in Europe are strongly associated with the state's cultural identity, but the immigrant experience in Wisconsin is far more varied. Canada has been a small but steady source of immigrants throughout the state's history. Several increasingly large phases of immigration from Mexico and other nations around Latin America have left imprints around the state, ranging from Milwaukee to dairy and vegetable farms in rural areas. In recent decades, immigrants from Asia have likewise increasingly made their home in the state, with Hmong communities standing out. As new groups of immigrants arrive in Wisconsin, their civic, religions and economic contributions adds to the state's diversity.
 
Dane County has been selected as one of 13 sites across the country to test a new model: a public-defender-style system aimed at providing a lawyer to every detained, indigent immigrant.
Among immigrants living in Wisconsin whose cases began between 2010 and 2015, those who had lawyers were more than six times as likely to be allowed to stay in the country as those who didn't have representation.
Julio Gumeta came to Wisconsin when he was seven years old. Now, 17 years later, he wants to attend UW-Milwaukee but cannot afford the out-state-tuition rates that undocumented immigrants are required to pay.
When large numbers of emigrants from Norway started making their way to the United States in the mid-19th century, Wisconsin was one of the first places they settled.
The funding system for English Language Learner education in Wisconsin schools with are facing challenges in places with high proportions of students needing these services, from urban districts like Green Bay to those in rural communities like Abbotsford.
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In the mid 1970s, Cheu and Chia Vang of Laos moved to the United States from a refugee camp in Thailand — part of the first wave of Hmong refugees to resettle in the United States.
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Lutefisk is a Scandinavian delicacy. It's a polarizing dish; some people grow up loving it, while others despise it.
Roberto Tecpile often puts in 70 hours a week at the Rosenholm dairy farm in Cochrane — a village in Buffalo County where winter days are short and can be bitterly cold.
Seasonal workers who traveled from Mexico, and Texas-born people of Mexican descent, known as Tejanos, became a crucial part of Wisconsin's agricultural workforce during and after World War II.
In 2015, Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan sued three employment agencies in Chicago's Chinatown, and two Illinois restaurants that had used their services, for allegedly exploiting Latino immigrant workers in several states, including Wisconsin.