Series: Wisconsin's Diverse Waves Of Immigration

Wisconsin is not among the 17 states known to host facilities where the federal government detains migrant children. The state does, however, have two facilities where U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement holds adult detainees.
Wisconsin no es uno de los 17 estados donde el gobierno federal tiene centros de detención para niños inmigrantes. Sin embargo, el estado tiene dos centros de detención para adultos.
Mexican immigrants and their descendants born in the United States comprise a growing and increasingly visible group of communities around Wisconsin.
While place of birth is straightforward for most people, for a few the waters are uncertain.
Immigration is an engine of change that has shaped Wisconsin throughout its history, reflecting the broader story of newcomers building new communities around the United States.
Immigration as a top line issue for dairy farmers would have been unthinkable just a generation ago when Wisconsin's agricultural landscape was dominated by small and medium-sized dairy farms run by the families that owned them.
As one of the state's largest industries and the core of its Cheesehead identity, dairy production is heavily dependent on immigrant workers.
Milwaukee's first community of Mexican immigrants flourished briefly but was shattered by the tragedy of the Great Depression.
Around 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 7 in a classroom on Madison's south side, a group of mostly Latino immigrants and English as a Second Language teachers sat in a circle listening intently as two special guests answered their questions.
The first week of the Trump administration brought a hail of executive orders, including two that marked an abrupt shift in U.S. immigration policy.