Series: Wisconsin's Diverse Waves Of Immigration

Many distinct and ongoing waves of immigration have indelibly shaped communities across Wisconsin. The 19th-century influxes of immigrants from Germany, Scandinavia and elsewhere in Europe are strongly associated with the state's cultural identity, but the immigrant experience in Wisconsin is far more varied. Canada has been a small but steady source of immigrants throughout the state's history. Several increasingly large phases of immigration from Mexico and other nations around Latin America have left imprints around the state, ranging from Milwaukee to dairy and vegetable farms in rural areas. In recent decades, immigrants from Asia have likewise increasingly made their home in the state, with Hmong communities standing out. As new groups of immigrants arrive in Wisconsin, their civic, religions and economic contributions adds to the state's diversity.
 
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Before Martha Stewart and Ina Garten, there was Lizzie Kander and The Settlement Cook Book .
Imagine not being able to speak English, or not very much of it, and facing deportation proceedings in federal immigration court.
Franco Ferreyra overstayed his entry into the United States when his 90 days were up under the visa waiver program. That was in 2001. Now he awaits deportation in an ICE detention facility in Dodge County.
Wisconsin is not among the 17 states known to host facilities where the federal government detains migrant children. The state does, however, have two facilities where U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement holds adult detainees.
Wisconsin no es uno de los 17 estados donde el gobierno federal tiene centros de detención para niños inmigrantes. Sin embargo, el estado tiene dos centros de detención para adultos.
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Italians say festa, Latinos say fiesta, and the Irish say feis, but it all means "festival" in Milwaukee.
Mexican immigrants and their descendants born in the United States comprise a growing and increasingly visible group of communities around Wisconsin.
Nearly one year after she attended President Donald Trump's first speech to Congress, Lupe Salmeron feels uncertain about her future as a "Dreamer" in the United States.
While place of birth is straightforward for most people, for a few the waters are uncertain.
Immigration is an engine of change that has shaped Wisconsin throughout its history, reflecting the broader story of newcomers building new communities around the United States.