Series: 2015 Avian Flu Epidemic

While a handful of isolated cases of avian influenza made headlines in early 2017, the threat they posed to Wisconsin's poultry industry was mitigated by lessons learned from the 2015 outbreak.More
Two years after an outbreak of avian influenza centered on the Upper Midwest infected birds at multiple poultry operations in Wisconsin, the disease may once again be posing a threat.More
That delicious Thanksgiving spread this year will be the least expensive its been since 2010, according to the Wisconsin Farm Bureau.More
Chickens
Earlier this year, avian flu devastated the poultry industry across Wisconsin and the country.More
Ring-necked pheasant
Avian influenza has been in the news quite a bit over the last year, including around Wisconsin. While much of this coverage has focused on the farms that saw outbreaks and its effects on consumers' pocketbooks, comparatively little attention has been given to the costs experienced by other poultry enterprises.More
A poultry barn floor covered by young chickens
As a highly contagious avian influenza virus spread through the U.S.'s poultry population in 2015, something else began catching on: the word "depopulation."More
Avian flu impacts in the U.S.
The 2015 avian influenza epidemic was the largest in U.S. history, affecting more than 48 million domestic poultry birds in 15 states between December 2014 and June 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.More
Visualization by Scott Gordon. Data source: Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP).
Avian influenza struck more than 1.9 million chickens, turkeys and mixed-breed fowl across four Wisconsin counties between April and May 2015.More
Influenza A virus
Influenza is an infectious disease that can be transmitted between and among numerous species of animals, including humans and other mammals, and wild and domesticated birds.
Backyard chickens
Avian influenzas, including the highly pathogenic varieties, can infect birds both wild and domesticated. Birds carrying the virus can pass it on to other birds through airborne contact, as it is found in respiratory secretions and saliva.