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As Wisconsin braces for climate change and a future with more flooding, a conservationist discusses the role that wetlands can play.
While the widely known opioid epidemic killed 3,800 people in Wisconsin between 2014 and 2018, a surge in meth use has quietly supplanted opioids in western and northern parts of the state.
Dr. Lynn D'Andrea knew something was amiss when three teenagers with similar mysterious, dangerous lung injuries came into the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin one after another, gasping for air.
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Tyrese Mosbey was shot in the head at a bus stop after school, and the teenager and his family have struggled through the recovery process. Milwaukee Office of Violence Prevention Director Reggie Moore discusses the trauma of non-fatal shootings and their impacts on the community.
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Gov. Tony Evers has signed his first four pardons, the first granted in Wisconsin since 2010. The state Pardon Advisory Board member and former Madison police chief Noble Wray discusses how the group makes recommendations about pardons to the governor's office.
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A years-long slump in Wisconsin school enrollment is continuing. Sarah Kemp, a researcher with the University of Wisconsin Applied Population Lab explains why — and in which types of school districts — these drops are happening.
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About one in six households across Wisconsin lack an internet connection, creating digital inequities that impact students and communities as a whole. Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction broadband consultant Bill Herman discusses these gaps and where schools are finding solutions.
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Wisconsin Life
Members of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa made a trek to Pacwawong Lake in northern Wisconsin to pass on the tradition of harvest wild rice, or manoomin, to tribal youth.
October is the ideal time to plant garlic in Wisconsin, so long as growers properly prepare their newly-planted cloves for a long, cold winter.
The connection between Wisconsin's rivers and the wetlands that feed them has become increasingly tenuous. Its consequences for human communities come into clearer focus when heavy rains transform streams and rivers into forces of wanton destruction.