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Wisconsin's so-called "minimum markup law" was debated this year, when Gov. Tony Evers proposed eliminating it as part of his road and infrastructure budget. UW-Eau Claire geographer Ryan Weichelt explains how this Depression-era law affects gas prices in the Eau Claire area.
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On this particular day, and in this particular year, the regal fritillary appeared to be thriving at the Schurch-Thomson Prairie outside Barneveld.
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There's a price to pay when someone is sent to jail in Wisconsin — literally. Wisconsin Watch managing editor Dee Hall discusses the widespread practice of of Wisconsin counties charging inmates for their stay in jail. Are these fees necessary, or do they violate the rights of those incarcerated?
Confusion over what drives differences in gas prices between gas stations in the same town ⁠— or even at the same intersection ⁠— can be a constant source of frustration for drivers.
In late May 2019, Wisconsin Watch sent a survey to all 72 county jails asking for information about their incarceration fees.
At least 23 Wisconsin counties assess "pay-to-stay" fees, which charge inmates for room and board for the time they are incarcerated. In addition, there are other fees inmates must pay, depending on the county they are in.
Wisconsin's self-proclaimed moniker as "America's Dairyland" is taking on fresh meaning in the 21st century thanks to a growing market for milk from an animal that bleats rather than moos.
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As groups of siblings sit around a large campfire, they begin to share stories while eating a few snacks. They're starting to make memories that will have to last them until they can see each other again. And for some of them, that could be for a whole year.
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Open records requests allow citizens to see what politicians are doing and saying out of the public eye. Bill Lueders, president of the Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council, discusses how this tool of transparency can turn murky.
Students entering their senior year of high school in the fall of 2019 appear to be among the largest classes in Wisconsin for the foreseeable future.