Images via U.S. Department of Agriculture

Series: Climate Science And Wisconsin

Climate science is complex. Because changes to the global climate span continents and develop over decades, their effects on individual places and weather events are difficult to pinpoint. But with an ever growing body of historical climate data and sophisticated computer modeling, scientists can forecast how climate change is unfolding — and likely continue to play out — in places like Wisconsin with increasing confidence. In coming decades communities around the state are projected to continue experiencing warmer and more extreme weather. These effects are increasingly being recognized, with winter and nighttime temperatures rising, and heavier rainstorms occurring with increasing regularity. From the environment to human health to the economy, gauging the impacts of a changing climate is an urgent scientific endeavor with implications for every Wisconsinite.
 
Climate change may give a big boost to dairy farming in the Midwest, including Michigan and northern Wisconsin, a new study of the future for U.S. dairy farms reports.
Scientists have known for a long time that major floods are becoming more common.
It's not always easy to anticipate a drastic change in an ecosystem.
Scientists anticipate that shifts in the global climate will affect the Wisconsin's waters, wildlife and more in profound and perhaps unexpected ways.
A Florida State University professor looked to Wisconsin to investigate how climate change might make people more vulnerable to groundwater-borne pathogens in the decades ahead.
The national headlines on global warming typically focus on the recent stretch of record high temperatures, the retreat of glaciers and rising sea levels. For the average Wisconsinite, those effects may feel distant, even abstract.
References to climate change, rising temperatures and the human activities that cause them have been removed recently from a Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources web page.
City centers typically are hotter than suburbs, which in turn tend to be hotter than rural areas, controlling for other factors. The more developed and densely populated an area, the more buildings, asphalt and other solid surfaces amplify and absorb the heat of the sun, usually with fewer plants to help cool things down.
A warming climate is transforming the base of the food web in the Great Lakes, according to a new study published recently in the scientific journal Limnology and Oceanography .
A new study on oak trees in southwest Wisconsin could improve predictions about climate change.