Series: Food Security And Assistance In Wisconsin

Wisconsin's new round of food stamp rules tightening work requirements also comes as a state jobs program aimed at FoodShare beneficiaries shows mixed results.
Throughout the growing season, many Wisconsinites stop by farmers' markets to grab a bite to eat, chat with neighbors and, of course, purchase fresh produce and other foods. But this type of shopping can be cost prohibitive for people who have lower or fixed incomes.
With the release of Gov. Scott Walker's 2017-19 budget proposal, Wisconsin is again debating how distribution of food stamps should work.
Employment may be up in Wisconsin, but some families are still struggling to put food on the table, and it can be even more challenging for older adults.
Community groups often host food drives at various points during the year to fill local pantry shelves. Donors can enhance the value of their gifts by ensuring the food is safe, nutritious and of high quality.
People who worry about not having enough to eat cope in different ways. Some borrow money, neglect health care or defer paying bills. Many choose foods of poor nutritional value because they cost less but are filling.
Many people are looking forward to a big Thanksgiving dinner with family and friends. Meanwhile, Wisconsin food banks have been trying to bring a feast to those who are less fortunate this holiday season.
Wisconsin is one of 31 states and three United States territories where obesity among children living in poor families decreased, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Milwaukee County will soon be home to the largest urban organic fruit orchard in the United States.
Locally grown produce is fresh. It tastes better and is more nutritious than food grown far away.