Illustration by Scott Gordon and Kristian Knutsen

Series: Foxconn In Wisconsin

Wisconsin's deal with electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn has stirred up a mix of excitement and doubt. The state offered the Taiwan-based company about $3 billion in economic incentives and a waiver on a variety of environmental and other regulations to build a large LCD fabrication complex. In return, Foxconn touted the possibility of creating thousands of jobs and invigorating Wisconsin as a Midwestern tech hub. This type of manufacturing would place considerable demands on the state's natural resources, especially water, and can create significant pollution. The net effect of this deal will take years to emerge, but boosters and skeptics alike agree that a Foxconn footprint would have profound and complex implications for Wisconsin's future.
 
Shared via
WPT
The Foxconn project has taken a toll on residents of Mount Pleasant who have sold their properties to accommodate the development of new roads. WPR reporter Corrinne Hess discusses divisions between homeowners and the local government over these land acquisitions.
Shared via
WPT
An economic study examining the Foxconn tax credits details how the state could still face high costs even if it renegotiates the contract. Tim Bartik, a senior economist at the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research discusses these findings.
Most Americans are likely not very aware of the the United States' complex economic dependency on Taiwan. But when it comes to Wisconsin, the story quickly gets even more complicated.
Gov. Tony Evers announced he is seeking to renegotiate Wisconsin's contract with Foxconn, drawing ire from state Republicans. Bejing-based economics commentator Einar Tangen speaks to these developments.
A bubbling sense of uncertainty enveloping Foxconn's plans for its manufacturing and research operations in Wisconsin has sparked considerable speculation around the state in the opening months of 2019.
With the news that Foxconn will be changing its initial manufacturing plans in Wisconsin, economist Einar Tangen and tech industry insider Paul Semenza weigh in on what the future holds for the LCD manufacturer in the state.
Despite ongoing changes to Foxconn's plans for its Mount Pleasant operation that could substantially lower its water needs, construction of municipal infrastructure tapping Lake Michigan is continuing as scheduled.
The confusion over Foxconn paints a picture of different ways politics and industrial development are conducted in China versus the United States.
Questions surround the types of jobs Foxconn requires: What levels of educational attainment or skills are needed? What are typical wages for these types of occupations? Are these jobs susceptible to replacement through automation or computerization?
The 10th anniversary of the Great Lakes Compact's creation comes at a time when the durability and effectiveness of the agreement are under close scrutiny.