Will Kenneally/PBS Wisconsin

Series: Policing Practices And Accountability In Wisconsin


 
Shared via
WPR
Marches and gatherings over the killing of George Floyd continued for a third consecutive day across Wisconsin — including in Madison and Milwaukee, where hundreds defied curfews to protest into the evening.
Shared via
WPR
Hundreds of volunteers and business owners were out early on May 31 in downtown Madison to clean up and repair storefronts after an evening of violence, looting and property damage following demonstrations over the death of George Floyd.
Shared via
WPR
Thousands gathered for demonstrations across Wisconsin, joining people nationwide to express outrage over the death of George Floyd, a black man killed in police custody in Minneapolis. What began as a day of peaceful protest in Madison, though, turned into a chaotic scene.
Shared via
PBS Wisconsin
Protests in Wisconsin continue to advocate an end to system racism, with a crowd of thousands in Madison joined by other rallies across the state, including in Appleton, Milwaukee and Sheboygan.
Shared via
PBS Wisconsin
What does the killing of George Floyd mean for the people of Wisconsin? Gov. Tony Evers discusses his concerns about racial inequity in policing and the disproportionate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people of color.
Shared via
PBS Wisconsin
Milwaukee residents called for change in the wake of three contentious days of protest in Minneapolis after George Floyd was killed in police custody.
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
Demonstrators marched in two separate protests in Milwaukee: One demanding justice for George Floyd and another demanding justice for Milwaukee resident Joel Acevedo.
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
Police and firefighter organizations are saying a new state law in Wisconsin will make it too difficult for first responders to get workers' compensation benefits if they get COVID-19 while on the job.
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
Police shut down a Wisconsin church service after a neighbor reported the church was violating the state's stay-home order. It wasn't, but the incident reveals that some friction still exists as religious communities seek to adapt to new restrictions.
Audio: 
Shared via
WPR
Wisconsin law enforcement agencies are keeping their communities informed on how they plan to enforce Gov. Evers' stay-at-home order. Individuals who violate the order could face up to 30 days in jail and a $250 fine.