Will Kenneally/PBS Wisconsin

Series: Policing Practices And Accountability In Wisconsin


 
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Milwaukee's crime rate is steadily decreasing, according to city officials. Over the last five years, the city has seen a 33% reduction in violent crime including homicides, nonfatal shootings and carjackings.
In 2018, blacks were four times as likely to be arrested as whites for marijuana possession in Wisconsin.
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Law enforcement agencies across Wisconsin are making changes to the way they operate in order to increase social distancing in hopes of slowing the spread of COVID-19.
When it comes to addressing cases identified as excited delirium in the field, there are many commonalities in training across law enforcement, emergency response and medical organizations in Wisconsin.
Individuals in law enforcement are being called out for derogatory and racist social media posts. Noble Wray, former Madison Chief of Police, discusses his work with police departments across the national on issues of policing and community trust.
The term "excited delirium" describes a physical and mental state that has been cited as a cause of death in dozens of officer-involved deaths across the United States in recent decades.
The 2017 death of West Milwaukee resident Adam Trammell has generated concern over whether the police acted inappropriately when they tased him multiple times. Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm and Trammell family attorney Robin Shellow discuss the case.
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The Milwaukee Police Department came under new scrutiny when a federal draft review of the department critical of its practices was published. State Rep. David Bowen, D-Milwaukee, explains that many of the claims against the department resonate with his constituents.
Bayfield County is building a tower to improve emergency communications — meanwhile, law enforcement agencies are investigating what may be done to improve emergency communications across the state.
Limited data about how the ShotSpotter alerts in Milwaukee between 2013 and 2015 shed some light on how this gunfire audio detection system is used by police.