Science

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As many Wisconsinites work from home because of the coronavirus pandemic, they're noticing more wildlife in city and suburban neighborhoods. UW-Madison professor David Drake discusses how wildlife is reacting to the enormous change in human habits.
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Research is showing that contrary to prior belief, allergic asthma and respiratory allergies are not major risk factors for acute COVID-19 symptoms in the way other health issues are.
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Contact tracing people exposed to COVID-19 is becoming increasingly important as Wisconsin starts to reopen, but what does the process actually look like? WisContext associate editor Will Cushman discusses how this public health effort is expanding around the state.
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Amid efforts to reduce backlogs of evidence submitted to the Wisconsin State Crime Lab for processing, turnaround times in some categories continue to grow, particularly when it comes to DNA evidence.
Everyone is vulnerable to conspiracism, said Ajay Sethi, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. With COVID-19, that's especially true.
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Coronavirus antibody tests are one potential tool to measure whether people may have immunity to the disease, and the State Lab of Hygiene is now seeking data on those tests from clinical labs.
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A federal government study, which will include roughly 300 families from Wisconsin, hopes to answer questions about how many children get infected, whether they develop symptoms and how it affects those with asthma.
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Wisconsin reported 460 new cases of COVID-19 on May 1 — a record number since the state started tracking the disease. WisContext associate editor Will Cushman discusses how case and test data are used by state officials as they consder relaxinng public health guidelines.
Is Wisconsin finding more cases of COVID-19 because more people are becoming infected with the virus that causes it, or because more people are being tested for it? Answers to this question are anything but simple.
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The Evers administration is pushing for more Wisconsinites to receive COVID-19 tests in an effort to open the state quickly. The governor set goals to provide free testing at long-term care facilities like nursing homes and to deploy state resources to track outbreaks at workplaces.