Science

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The number of wild deer testing positive for chronic wasting disease continues to rise in Wisconsin.
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Wisconsin and the United States are trending down in birth rates, marking a four-year decline according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. Nationwide, the birth rate hasn't been this low since 1985.
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A smartphone app from UW-Madison is helping Wisconsin's fruit and vegetable growers understand bee populations.
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After moving its spring hearings entirely online because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Wisconsin Conservation Congress reported a record-setting 64,943 responses — double the previous record — on a variety of conservation issues.
Short of a cure or effective treatment for COVID-19, something that could take years to develop, state and local health officials in Wisconsin are planning for a future where contact tracing plays a central role in combating the disease.
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As many Wisconsinites work from home because of the coronavirus pandemic, they're noticing more wildlife in city and suburban neighborhoods. UW-Madison professor David Drake discusses how wildlife is reacting to the enormous change in human habits.
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Research is showing that contrary to prior belief, allergic asthma and respiratory allergies are not major risk factors for acute COVID-19 symptoms in the way other health issues are.
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Contact tracing people exposed to COVID-19 is becoming increasingly important as Wisconsin starts to reopen, but what does the process actually look like? WisContext associate editor Will Cushman discusses how this public health effort is expanding around the state.
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Amid efforts to reduce backlogs of evidence submitted to the Wisconsin State Crime Lab for processing, turnaround times in some categories continue to grow, particularly when it comes to DNA evidence.
Everyone is vulnerable to conspiracism, said Ajay Sethi, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. With COVID-19, that's especially true.