Environment

It is a common misperception that forests stay the same. Woodlands change slowly over many years, and the shifts may be imperceptible to the casual observer.
Since the earliest days of humankind, people have excelled at exploring and expanding their presence to nearly every spot on the map. With all of this wanderlust, humans have been equally adept at taking other species with them on their travels — often with unintended consequences.
Journalist Dan Egan and political economist Jenny Kehl take Steve Paulson through the finer points of the politics of water in the Great Lakes.
When it comes to these blood-sucking pests and other creepy-crawlies, each year can be a different experience, with weather patterns and other factors playing important roles in the behaviors of insects and other arthropods like spiders and millipedes, as well as other invertebrates.
Supporting one high-profile Great Lakes diversion and opposing another might seem contradictory, but UW-Parkside geosciences professor John Skalbeck clearly sees no tension in his positions.
Scientists using GoPro cameras in Lake Michigan have found the lakebed coated in invasive quagga mussels.
Two centuries of urbanization and industrialization around the Great Lakes have often hinged on tension among those who've desired their extraordinary supplies of fresh water.
Community members and advocacy groups opposing the bid by Foxconn and the city of Racine for Lake Michigan water are zeroing on a specific issue: The request amounts to a water utility sourcing the Great Lakes almost entirely for the use of one private company.
Cities and businesses seeking to access Great Lakes waters often emphasize how minuscule their water use would be compared to even the supply of just one of the individual lakes.
Wisconsin is regularly at the center of Great Lakes water politics, but it's not the only place where controversies arise.