Series: Waukesha And Lake Michigan Water

Community members and advocacy groups opposing the bid by Foxconn and the city of Racine for Lake Michigan water are zeroing on a specific issue: The request amounts to a water utility sourcing the Great Lakes almost entirely for the use of one private company
Wisconsin is regularly at the center of Great Lakes water politics, but it's not the only place where controversies arise.
Wisconsin has yet to wrap up one big conversation about how it uses Great Lakes water, and is already embarking upon another.
Waukesha's agreement with Milwaukee reflects the challenges that southeastern Wisconsin, the state's most populous region, will face in supplying its population with clean drinking water over coming decades.
As Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn touts its plans to build an LCD factory in southeastern Wisconsin, one open question is what demand that operation will place on Lake Michigan.
An effort by the city of Waukesha to source its drinking water from Lake Michigan is well over a decade in the making.
The city of Waukesha spent more than a decade seeking approval to source its drinking water supplies from Lake Michigan.
The city of Waukesha says it's moving ahead with plans to pipe in drinking water from Lake Michigan. But there could be a snag.
Waukesha scored a victory with the historic June 21, 2016 agreement to let the Milwaukee suburb draw 8.2 million gallons per day of drinking water from Lake Michigan. But following a years-long negotiation, both the state of Wisconsin and city of Waukesha had to make some concessions.