Caitlin McKown/UW Applied Population Laboratory

Series: UW Applied Population Lab: Wisconsin's Demographics

WisContext collaborates with researchers at the University of Wisconsin Applied Population Lab to explain demographic patterns and change around the state. These reports explore how Wisconsin's population shifts over time, and how the places people live, work and go to school can influence the health, economy, education and politics of Wisconsin. Data about a variety of population measures are presented in maps, charts and interactive visualizations to illustrate these trends. Demographic change guides the outlook of both individual communities and the state as a whole, influencing the news as it unfolds day-by-day and history as it takes shape over decades.
 
School referendums around Wisconsin have been steadily increasing in the 2010s, particularly years when a general election is held.
In Wisconsin, a desire for quality education and the costs of making such an investment has led to a funding system that can vary significantly by where a school is located.
The Great Recession disrupted not only economic and employment patterns, but demographic trends as well.
When the Supreme Court of the United States returned a closely-followed case on redistricting in Wisconsin to a lower court, the majority's decision suggested that they did not completely accept a specific metric of gerrymandering known as the efficiency gap.
Wisconsin is at the center of Gill v. Whitford , a lawsuit related to legislative redistricting heard by United States Supreme Court in October 2017. Malia Jones of the University of Wisconsin Applied Population Laboratory discusses how partisan gerrymandering works.
At a glance, Wisconsin's legislative district maps in place since 2011 do not reveal districts with the bizarre shapes and outlines that are classic markers of gerrymandering schemes. But a closer examination of the state's Assembly districts reveals a more sophisticated approach to this electoral stratagem.
Wisconsin has eight seats out of 435 total in the U.S. House of Representatives, at least until population fluctuations within the state and around the nation entitle it to a different level of representation.
While place of birth is straightforward for most people, for a few the waters are uncertain.
The number of babies born in a given year can have deep social and economic implications, as both younger and older adults may know from their experiences in crowded schools, competitive job markets, and, for the latter, retirement destinations.