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Sherrie Tussler
Wisconsin wasn't testing the limits of its relationship with the USDA in April 2015, which is when it began statewide implementation of a rule requiring "able-bodied adults without dependents" on SNAP to either spend at least 20 hours a week working (or volunteering or undergoing training), or otherwise lose their benefits after three months.
Milwaukee-based Hunger Task Force Director Sherri Tussler said 65 percent of people who participated in the FoodShare Employment and Training Program lost their food assistance and did not gain employment.
Kevin Moore of Wisconsin Department of Health Services said 12,000 people enrolled in the FoodShare program entered the workforce as part of its employment and training program.
Russ Groves
Wisconsin is a national leader in growing and processing specialty crops that include sweet corn, green beans, peas, potatoes and, of course, cranberries. These plants attract plenty of pests that eat and damage the crops, making their management a primary concern of farmers.
Farm succession planning
It is springtime and many farmers are shifting gears from winter chores to planting. They have much work to do: developing a cropping plan, ordering seed and fertilizer, making sure equipment is in working order, and lining up enough help for the season.
Cory Cochart
In recent years, the smell, environmental impacts and human health risks of spraying liquefied manure over crop fields has raised questions and concerns among a growing number of Wisconsin residents.
University of Wisconsin professor Ken Genskow is chair of a work group studying the safety of liquid manure irrigation and its effects on health and the environment in places where it is used.
Town of Lincoln chair Cory Cochart said the community banned liquid manure irrigation because of health risks related to inhaling pathogens, and the township is prepared to stand up to higher government officials who want to override its decision.
Todd Allbaugh
Wisconsin's April 5 election instigated two notable media blowups over the state's voter ID law.
Elizabethkingia culture
A species of bacteria called Elizabethkingia anophelis has caused serious blood infections in dozens of Wisconsinites since November 2015. As of April 8, 2016, 18 of those patients have died, according to state health officials.