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Brown marmorated stink bug on an apple
Though the brown marmorated stink bug has only been spotted in Wisconsin over the last seven years, entomologists tracking the species suggest that it may become a prominent problem for farmers and gardeners. Links to resources and more information about it follow.
Brown marmorated stink bug
As growers and agriculture researchers have learned during the brown marmorated stink bug's 20-year migration across the U.S., managing the pest is difficult.
Comparison of stink bug species
As an invasive species in North America, the brown marmorated stink bug is the subject of ongoing scientific study, particularly by researchers in regions the species colonized.
Brown marmorated stink bug spreads in Wisconsin
Wisconsin may be at a turning point with the brown marmorated stink bug.
Apple showing brown marmorated stink bug damage
The brown marmorated stink bug is an invasive species in the United States that is expanding its range as an agricultural pest around the nation.
Brown marmorated stink bug
A smelly and increasingly infamous agricultural pest that is expanding through the United States, the brown marmorated stink bug is native to East Asia, where it challenges farmers throughout the region.
Sherrie Tussler
Wisconsin wasn't testing the limits of its relationship with the USDA in April 2015, which is when it began statewide implementation of a rule requiring "able-bodied adults without dependents" on SNAP to either spend at least 20 hours a week working (or volunteering or undergoing training), or otherwise lose their benefits after three months.
Milwaukee-based Hunger Task Force Director Sherri Tussler said 65 percent of people who participated in the FoodShare Employment and Training Program lost their food assistance and did not gain employment.
Kevin Moore of Wisconsin Department of Health Services said 12,000 people enrolled in the FoodShare program entered the workforce as part of its employment and training program.
Russ Groves
Wisconsin is a national leader in growing and processing specialty crops that include sweet corn, green beans, peas, potatoes and, of course, cranberries. These plants attract plenty of pests that eat and damage the crops, making their management a primary concern of farmers.